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Focus: Post/Production Masking: The Black Art Of Video Making Here is a simple ten step tutorial on making a mask
By David Hague Masking to many, is the black art of video making. It all sounds, well, too hard to bother with, with terms such as 'alpha channel', 'compositing' and 'overlay' to deal with. But trust me gentle reader, knowing even the basics of masking and compositing will add a whole new dimension to your home videos, family documentaries, short films and so on. We'll start with something simple. For the sake of the exercise I am using Sony Vegas Pro here, but the basics apply to any editing package (NLE) that dares call itself such. ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Mark Syncs the Spot Learn how to use markers to replace the legacy in/out marks to create manual sync points
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia One of the most missed features of legacy Final Cut Pro is persistent in and out marks. That is to say, once in and out marks are set in a clip, they remain exactly where they are, as a part of the clip, until explicitly changed or removed. Unfortunately, this arguably essential feature for digital video editing did not make it into Final Cut Pro X. If you set in and out points on a clip then deselect that clip and reselect it, the in and out marks are gone. While it is true that you can use ratings, like Favorites, in FCPX to create persistent clip selections, in and out points have valuable uses beyond just marking a usable portion of a video clip. ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Torpedoed by Subtitles Having a plan is key to the success of any aspect of a project and prepping for subtitling is no exception
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia A video or film project's titles provide crucial information to the viewer, whether it's the opening and closing credits identifying a video or film, the principals involved (the talent and production crew), or lower thirds, the nouns of video, identifying the people, places and things being viewed. Subtitles play a significant role, particularly in editorial or documentary work, in a number of ways. Subtitles make clear, speech or dialog that is difficult to hear or understand, as when people mumble or use unfamiliar dialects; provide language translations for viewers to better understand dialog in foreign languages, especially if the video is produced in a language not native to the viewer; and to make your film or video more accessible to viewers with hearing impairments. ...Read More »
Focus: Broadcast Transitional Animation An introduction to the world of transitional animation
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Final Cut Pro X provides a number of interesting ways to animate video elements in the Viewer and Timeline to provide complex visual effects. But do you know how to create quick and simple animations just by using transitions? The beauty of this technique is its simplicity. No complex motion paths to adjust, no messing about with untold keyframes, just add a transition and set the timing and you're off to the next project. ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Render the Fat in Final Cut Pro X What do you do if the render files become corrupt?
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Render files are the video files that Final Cut Pro creates when you make adjustments to your video clips. Add a filter or transition, crop the image change the clip's speed, and Final Cut Pro has to create brand new video files using your original media and applying the changes. When the video is played in the project timeline, the render files are played in place of the original video clips, where you have added effects. But what do you do if the render files become corrupt? Or when projects are completed and you want to back them up without the render files? ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Command and Conquer Your Keyboard Commands By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Final Cut Pro has provided keyboard shortcuts for the vast majority of its functions, but there have always been a few features or functions where it made sense to have a keyboard shortcut, but none was pre-built and ready to use. In legacy versions of Final Cut Pro you could add, remove or modify keyboard shortcuts by using the Keyboard Layout tools. In Final Cut Pro X you use the Commands feature to add, remove, modify, and otherwise manage changes to keyboard shortcuts. In this tutorial you'll learn how to add new shortcuts for functions that don't have them, how to create new Command Sets, and how to export and import command sets to access these shortcuts across multiple editing stations. ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Reconnecting with Lost Video by Relinking In Final Cut Pro X, it is easier to recover from moved or deleted media file problems
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Final Cut Pro X manages all of your media files by grouping them in various Events that you create. This makes it more difficult, but not impossible, for media files to go missing. Events can be moved, deleted or renamed, and Apple recommends that you do these operations from within Final Cut Pro itself so that FCPX can always properly keep track of the media files. But there will be times when you move, delete, or rename files directly in the Finder, and that could prevent FCPX from properly referencing the media files. ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Pesky Updates Ate the Video of My Homework There are preventive and troubleshooting techniques you can use to help resolve issues when updating Final Cut Pro
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Apple recently updated Final Cut Pro to version 10.0.3, adding a boatload of welcome new features and fixes, and just as with the previous updates, also introducing a number of problems for people after updating to the latest version of FCPX. There are a few things you can do to prepare for an update to help minimize problems and disruptions to your workflow, and a few things you can do after an update to help recover. This tutorial will outline some steps you can take to a more successful update. ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Under New Management Final Cut Pro X Makes It Easy To Manage Files
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia In legacy versions of Final Cut Pro you had to set scratch disks to manage where your video data and cache files would be stored. And you were limited to twelve drives at any one time. Final Cut Pro X makes it easier to specify where your video and project files are stored, automatically saving your Events and Projects in the Movies folder by default. But have no fear, your Events and Projects can be stored on any drive connected to your Mac, and you can easily move existing Events and Projects between drives when needed to keep your stories organized. ...Read More »
Focus: Broadcast Intangible Tangibility In FCP X, the Reimporting from Camera/Archive feature can restore missing or damaged video clips quickly and cleanly
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia In the digital age of filmmaking we no longer rely on the tangibility of film to preserve our work during editing and post-production, but on the collected virtual sequences of binary ones and zeroes stored magnetically or optically on various flavors of digital media. The new digital workflow brings about its own issues of storage, maintenance, and long term reliability which makes it all the more essential to protect your story's data files. ...Read More »
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