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Focus: Broadcast Documenting A Road Trip Via Video By David Hague The Monaro is to be wired up with a phalanx of camcorders; a Kaiser Baas dashcam is mounted on the windscreen with a 64GB Sandisk card, a Sony HDD DCR-SR200 Handycam is on a Hague headrest mount (no relation by the way), and a Canon Legria Mini-X 'action cam' is to perform roving boundary rider camcorder duties when not mounted to another Hague mount, a suction based heavy duty unit kitted out with Manfrotto hardware. Audio is also well catered for too. An Azden wireless mic setup with a label lav mic will record dialogue to a Samsung Recorder, a RØDE VideoMic Go on the Sony will record ambience, suitably backed up with a RØDE Videomic 2 on the Legria. ...Read More »
Focus: Broadcast Mounting Camera To Auto Headset By David Hague I have been asked by a few people to give some more nuts'n'bolts information on the mounts I have in the Monaro. First up, we'll look at the headrest mount. It's quite a simple affair on the surface, in being a bracket that wraps around the 'posts' of the lifted headrest, and this is then tightened by a couple of butterfly/wingnuts. ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Do You Know How Long An Average Scene Lasts? If you want to make your own movies more interesting, think about timing and camera angles
By David Hague How long do you reckon the average scene in a TV show lasts for? A minute? 30 seconds? There is nothing more boring than watching a fixed camera shooting a scene for a long period of time. And I define a long period of time as more than 15 seconds! ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Transitional Animation An introduction to the world of transitional animation
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Final Cut Pro X provides a number of interesting ways to animate video elements in the Viewer and Timeline to provide complex visual effects. But do you know how to create quick and simple animations just by using transitions? The beauty of this technique is its simplicity. No complex motion paths to adjust, no messing about with untold keyframes, just add a transition and set the timing and you're off to the next project. ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Command and Conquer Your Keyboard Commands By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Final Cut Pro has provided keyboard shortcuts for the vast majority of its functions, but there have always been a few features or functions where it made sense to have a keyboard shortcut, but none was pre-built and ready to use. In legacy versions of Final Cut Pro you could add, remove or modify keyboard shortcuts by using the Keyboard Layout tools. In Final Cut Pro X you use the Commands feature to add, remove, modify, and otherwise manage changes to keyboard shortcuts. In this tutorial you'll learn how to add new shortcuts for functions that don't have them, how to create new Command Sets, and how to export and import command sets to access these shortcuts across multiple editing stations. ...Read More »
Focus: Broadcast Reconnecting with Lost Video by Relinking In Final Cut Pro X, it is easier to recover from moved or deleted media file problems
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Final Cut Pro X manages all of your media files by grouping them in various Events that you create. This makes it more difficult, but not impossible, for media files to go missing. Events can be moved, deleted or renamed, and Apple recommends that you do these operations from within Final Cut Pro itself so that FCPX can always properly keep track of the media files. But there will be times when you move, delete, or rename files directly in the Finder, and that could prevent FCPX from properly referencing the media files. ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Pesky Updates Ate the Video of My Homework There are preventive and troubleshooting techniques you can use to help resolve issues when updating Final Cut Pro
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia Apple recently updated Final Cut Pro to version 10.0.3, adding a boatload of welcome new features and fixes, and just as with the previous updates, also introducing a number of problems for people after updating to the latest version of FCPX. There are a few things you can do to prepare for an update to help minimize problems and disruptions to your workflow, and a few things you can do after an update to help recover. This tutorial will outline some steps you can take to a more successful update. ...Read More »
Focus: Post/Production Intangible Tangibility In FCP X, the Reimporting from Camera/Archive feature can restore missing or damaged video clips quickly and cleanly
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia In the digital age of filmmaking we no longer rely on the tangibility of film to preserve our work during editing and post-production, but on the collected virtual sequences of binary ones and zeroes stored magnetically or optically on various flavors of digital media. The new digital workflow brings about its own issues of storage, maintenance, and long term reliability which makes it all the more essential to protect your story's data files. ...Read More »
Focus: Broadcast Choosing Boris Continuum Complete for a New System Part 2 of Making the Switch
By Jeremiah Hall I switched from Final Cut Pro to Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 last summer, and three projects later, I'm still happy. But when I wrote my original article, there was one thing I never considered - losing my existing plug-ins I used in FCP. Every editor has plug-ins, some we use daily, others we only need to pull out once in a great while. After Effects and Premiere come with some pretty useful ones, but once in a while I need something a little more specialized. ...Read More »
Focus: Broadcast My Favorite Things In Final Cut Pro edit multiple clips into a project with just the parts you want
By Diana Weynand, James Alguire and RevUpTansmedia In the legacy versions of Final Cut Pro you marked a portion of a clip that you wanted to use by setting in and out points. One cool thing about in and out points is that they are persistent, that is, once set in a clip they remain set until you explicitly removed them. This made it very easy to edit multiple clips into the Timeline with just the scenes you wanted. ...Read More »
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